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The many layers of landscape photography

andyhemingway

What is it about landscape photography that makes me keep going back for more?

I spent much of one Sunday morning asking myself this question, as a ferocious wind did its damnedest to blast me off of Marsden Moor.

A wind blasted morning at Millstone Edge A wind blasted morning at Millstone Edge

Crouched behind a large rock, which provided at least a little shelter from the grasping fingers of the Pennine wind, waiting for a break in the clouds, I began to ponder just what it was that had coaxed me out of bed at 4.00am and up on to the moor on a day like this. I spotted a jogger approaching, the only other living soul that I saw all morning. We waved at each other in grim solidarity, in recognition of each other’s battle with the elements.

It was this that made me realise that it was a question of motivation. I could have…

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The Absence of Poetry

Keen eyed readers may have noticed that the Poetry page has now disappeared from the menu options. This is to allow space for exciting future projects so, if you haven’t already done, please subscribe by clicking on the ‘follow’ button to your left to avoid missing all the latest updates and news. For previously published poetry I have created a small collection which is constantly being updated on the very easy to navigate site at Poemhunter: David Coldwell

Ammon Wrigley

As mentioned in Mark Kelly’s brilliant Marsden Poetry Trail: http://halfwayhike.com/2014/02/03/a-marsden-poetry-trail here’s Andy Hemingway’s fantastic original piece about Ammon Wrigley.

andyhemingway

Ammon Wrigley Ammon Wrigley

If you venture up on to Millstone Edge, at Standedge on Marsden Moor, you will be in good company. This little corner of the Pennines was so loved by local poet, writer and historian Ammon Wrigley, that his ashes were scattered near the Dinner Stone.

The views over Saddleworth overlook the places where he was born, raised and lived his whole, long life. Look closer and you will spot his memorial plaque. Now sat between those of his two daughters.

The Wrigley Plaques

THE ASHES OF
AMMON WRIGLEY
BELOVED WRITER OF SADDLEWORTH
FOLK-LORE, PROSE AND POEMS,
WERE SCATTERED FROM THIS SPOT

ON THE 14TH SEPTEMBER
— 1946 —

HIS WAS THE SWEET AND GENEROUS SOUL
THAT LOVED NOT SELF ALONE
BUT TO OUR POORER NATURES GAVE
THE FRAGRANCE OF HIS OWN.

WINDS OF THE PENNINES FRESH AND FREE
YOU WERE EVER GOOD FRIENDS TO ME
OUT ON THE…

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March Hill and Cupwith Circular – a hike to the wild north

For anyone interested in hiking and the wild moors of the North have a look at Mark Kelly’s excellent blog, Halfway Hike.
This weekend will see the twelfth annual Birthday Walk from the Coldwell household which gives a great opportunity to follow one of Mark’s guides. The Birthday walks are a result of my now fifteen year old son who at only three years, on a cold January day, conquered Penhyghent in the Yorkshire Dales. He has been hiking ever since and completed the three peaks at the age of eleven. Now, as near to his birthday as the weekend permits we drag ourselves off over moors and hills seeking new adventures. The Wild North seems a perfect choice for Sunday.

Archived Halfway Hike

The Wild North is a bit tongue in cheek .. head south from Marsden, up Wessenden and over to Black Hill on a winter’s day and that’ll give any kind of wild a run for its money. But the moors area north of Marsden, to my mind, feels a bit wilder than the areas I normally walk across, to the south and west.  I fancied a bit of a change and wanted to have a mooch around March Hill and also to check out Cupwith a bit as it’s the planned home for a couple of wind turbines at some stage.. so I combined the two with a circular walk last Sunday.

8.3 miles over 5 hours or so, according to viewranger. At that pace you can see that some of the going was a bit slow, as Brodie and I picked our way across large grassy knolls and semi- bog in…

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