You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ category.

Calder Valley Poetry

It’s tomorrow! Marsden Public Library at 7 pm, hosted by David Coldwell. Plus guest readers Stephanie Bowgett and Mark Hinchliffe, and an open mic. And if that’s not enough there are refreshments.

If you can’t make it, follow this link to buy a copy of Revealing the Odour of Earth – https://caldervalleypoetry.com/book-shop/

View original post

Bright Thing

I’m drawing imaginary dragons or monsters
in the back room of the terraced house on Grange
when my father walks in and takes the pencil from my hand.

He sketches an aeroplane for no reason other than to show
me he can; his party trick. The rough of his skin with oil
and coolant ingrained scratches on the paper.

My mother steps in and outlines the shape of an elephant
floating in space, oblivious to all the things that surround it.
Later I throw paint at it all, bring the monster to life.

David Coldwell is an artist and writer based in the South Pennines. His debut pamphlet, Flowers by the Road (Templar Poetry) is available now.

View original post

Roy Marshall

I’ve recently had the pleasure of hearing and reading poems by James Giddings and I asked him to contribute some poems to showcase here. I don’t want to label James’ work as it is varied and obviously evolving, but many of his poems contain dry self-effacing humour and gentle melancholy. This element of wistful tragi-comedy is combined with high narrative energy and neatness and economy of style. I hope James won’t mind me saying that these two aspects make his work sometimes seem like a cross between Simon Armitage and John Hegley, although his own voice is very distinctive.

James is twenty three years old and is currently studying for his MA at Sheffield Hallam University, funded by the Arts Humanities and Research Council. His poems have appeared in magazines including Black & Blue, Antiphon and The Cadaverine. He once won a silver medal for swimming at Cubs.

Mean Time

‘But we will…

View original post 388 more words

Poetry&Words at Glastonbury Festival

Once again, Poetry&Words are opening our floodgates to a delicious deluge of poets from far and wide.  Every year we take applications to perform on Glastonbury Festival’s poetry stage, and every year we are awestruck by the hundreds of amazing wordsmiths out there.  Last year we hosted an abundance of talent from international stars Buddy Wakefield and Tanya Evanson, to home grown greats John Hegley and Murray Lachlan Young.  If you’d like to walk in their footsteps, then this is your chance! We’re looking for applications from experienced writers and performers, with something quite excellent to offer the audience of the world’s biggest greenfield arts festival.

If you want to apply, please e-mail poetryandwords@hotmail.co.uk with a short bio and 1-3 video and/or audio files of you performing your work, preferably to a live audience. We’d prefer web links, but attachments (of manageable size!) will also be accepted. We will…

View original post 224 more words

A selection of new paintings will be released during October featuring scenes from both the Colne and Calder Valleys. More details very soon.

 

Two Houses (1 of 1).jpg

Two Houses by the Road

sparth-cottages-1-of-1

Sparth Cottages

the-last-house-1-of-1

The Last House

 

Last Stop

A number of original paintings are now available on Artfinder. For a limited time each painting will be delivered with a special selection of free gifts (prints and cards – by me). Please follow this link – Artfinder – for more information.

And to celebrate here’s the fabulous Richard Hawley. What’s not to like.

That's How The Light Gets In

The poppy

The poppy which Joseph Shaddick sent home

In these centennial days, evocations of the First World War in newspaper articles or TV and radio programmes can seem to follow familiar and well-worn paths.  But in this week’s Culture Show special on BBC 2, Simon Armitage came up with a commemoration that felt entirely original: his own poetic commentary on the war, using as his inspiration the stories of people whose lives were either ended or profoundly changed by it.  In The Great War: An Elegy, Armitage told seven unusual stories, closing each one with a new poem inspired by it.

Introducing the film, Armitage said:

A century ago this year, the First World War began. The Great War – but great only in its scale of catastrophe. Well over 700,000 British soldiers died in the bloodbath that followed. I don’t have a head for numbers – that statistic is incomprehensible. It’s about human beings – people who…

View original post 2,174 more words

The sun stands still.

Cotton Grass

The Pennines, mid-summer, 2013.

Artfinder

Follow David Coldwell on Artfinder

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Cotton Cloud

Cotton Stats

  • 15,634 views